The Press- MAVBBL in the News

Rising Sun-Elkton Mid Summer’s Night Match
 
Talbot and Potomac on Comcast SportsNet Washington 2014
 
Gettysburg Festival-2013
 
Brandywine BBC of West Chester
 
Take Me Out to the Really Old Ball Game (June 30, 2013-Hoboken Nine)
 
Hoboken-Flemington 2013
 
19th Century Base Ball in Virginia
 
Gothams In the News
 
Elkton Eclipse in Maryland Life
(Also selected as Maryland’s Best Kept Secret)
Opening Day 2012 in Smithtown, Long Island
 
 
Philadelphia Base Ball Exhibition and Fair (August 20 and 21)
 
Gettysburg 19th Century Base Ball Touranment (July 17 & 18)
 
Corbitt’s Charge, Westminster, MD (June 25) Elkton vs Mechanicsburg
 
Loudon County Base ball Day (June 12)
 
Loudoun County Base Ball Festival (Preview) (June 1, 2011)
Potomac vs Elkton; Elkton vs Chesapeake; Chesapeake vs Potomac
Flemington vs Newtown Strakes (Preview) (May 26,2011)
Eclipse BBC of Elkton at Athletic BBC of Philadelphia (April 3, 2011)
 
Cecil Club of Chesapeake City at Excelsior BBC of Arundel (April 3, 2011)
 
Maryland State Championship (Recap):
Philadelphia at Delaware (Recap w/Pictures)
 
 
 
 
 
Take the family out to the ballgame …of yesteryear
Wednesday, April 28, 2010
BY DONNA ROLANDO
Suburban Trends
STAFF WRITER
And somewhere men are laughing and somewhere children shout; but there’s no joy in Mudville, mighty Casey has struck out. – Casey at the Bat

For weekend plans that are bound to be a homerun with the family, Ringwood Manor is hosting a game of 19th century baseball on Sunday, May 2, but don’t expect the game you know.

When vintage teams – Flemington Neshanocks and Elizabeth Resolutes – go to bat at noon on that day, they will be playing by the rules established in 1873. This means no gloves for the fielders who play barehanded just as it was 125 years ago. In addition, players will be clad in authentic uniforms and equipment, giving spectators a taste of what base ball (yes it was two words prior to the 1880s) looked like before it evolved into the national pastime of today.

“If you really like baseball and really like history, this is for you,” said Bradley Shaw, president and founder of the Flemington Neshanock, in anticipation of Sunday’s game.

The public is invited to attend free of charge (in the open field next to parking lot B) and not only watch old-time Mudville come to life but also have a chance to speak to the players and try out some of the equipment. The teams welcome questions from the public and enjoy engaging with fans of all ages. Besides watching the field action among ballists (as players were once called), spectators will get to know how the rules of baseball have evolved. For example, Shaw explains that the batter in 19th century baseball got to choose a high or low pitch; three balls meant a walk instead of four; and “when you hit the ball it was fair or foul depending on where it hits the ground first.”

Also Sunday, during the seventh-inning stretch, spectators may hear a retelling of the classic baseball poem – “Casey at the Bat.”

“It’s definitely enjoyable to watch especially if they’re baseball fans,” said Rebecca Fitzgerald, park superintendent.

Since this is a new venture for Ringwood State Park, Sue Shutte, park historian, said, “We’ll be happy if we have a nice crowd that comes and enjoys the weather and cheers,” because that way the park could be on the way to making this an annual event.

“We like to get that period of history out to the public. It’s a period that’s often overlooked,” Shutte said.

Shutte said she doesn’t know if the Hewitt family that lived at Ringwood Manor was ever active in base ball, although they were athletic, or if they had attended any base ball games. What’s certain is that the games were popular for both affluent and working class families in New Jersey in the 19th century and that smaller teams did play in the area, she said.

Most often a site like Ringwood Manor will see Civil War re-enactments as a special event. But Shaw said the Neshanocks differ from re-enactors of history because the outcome of the game is never predicted.

“We’re playing a real game. They’re not fighting a real war,” he said.

According to the club’s Web site, “The original Flemington Neshanock were established in 1866 and comprised mainly of the town’s prominent constituents.”

These ballists may have been prominent in the community, but the Web site goes on to say, members of the original team were “apparently not very skilled ballists and often lost to their chief rivals, the Lambertville Logan, by the close scores of 77-25 and 71-47.” No records of this team are apparent after August 1867.

Today’s Neshanock were re-established in 2001 by Shaw, “proudly reviving the name of that long ago team but hopefully not imitating their base ball skills,” the Web site states. The Neshanock, comprised of mostly New Jersey players, travel all over the East Coast keeping old-time baseball alive, Shaw said.

According to the Vintage Base Ball Association Web site, games like are not new and have been around since the 1980s. Proper rules interpretation is an important aspect to the game, and these rules also dealt with behavior, like no swearing.

The May 2 event is sponsored by Ringwood State Park staff and the North Jersey Highlands Historical Society. There are no bleachers for the public, but those visiting can bring their own chairs or blanket to sit upon. Picnic tables in the area are available on a first-come, first serve basis. Heavy rain will cancel the event. Ringwood State Park is located at 1304 Sloatsburg Road.

E-mail: rolando@northjersey.com

And somewhere men are laughing and somewhere children shout; but there’s no joy in Mudville, mighty Casey has struck out. – Casey at the Bat
Flemington Neshanocks and Elizabeth Resolutes – go to bat at noon on that day, they will be playing by the rules established in 1873.
Flemington Neshanocks and Elizabeth Resolutes – go to bat at noon on that day, they will be playing by the rules established in 1873.

For weekend plans that are bound to be a homerun with the family, Ringwood Manor is hosting a game of 19th century baseball on Sunday, May 2, but don’t expect the game you know.

When vintage teams – Flemington Neshanocks and Elizabeth Resolutes – go to bat at noon on that day, they will be playing by the rules established in 1873. This means no gloves for the fielders who play barehanded just as it was 125 years ago. In addition, players will be clad in authentic uniforms and equipment, giving spectators a taste of what base ball (yes it was two words prior to the 1880s) looked like before it evolved into the national pastime of today.

“If you really like baseball and really like history, this is for you,” said Bradley Shaw, president and founder of the Flemington Neshanock, in anticipation of Sunday’s game.

The public is invited to attend free of charge (in the open field next to parking lot B) and not only watch old-time Mudville come to life but also have a chance to speak to the players and try out some of the equipment. The teams welcome questions from the public and enjoy engaging with fans of all ages. Besides watching the field action among ballists (as players were once called), spectators will get to know how the rules of baseball have evolved. For example, Shaw explains that the batter in 19th century baseball got to choose a high or low pitch; three balls meant a walk instead of four; and “when you hit the ball it was fair or foul depending on where it hits the ground first.”

Also Sunday, during the seventh-inning stretch, spectators may hear a retelling of the classic baseball poem – “Casey at the Bat.”

“It’s definitely enjoyable to watch especially if they’re baseball fans,” said Rebecca Fitzgerald, park superintendent.

Since this is a new venture for Ringwood State Park, Sue Shutte, park historian, said, “We’ll be happy if we have a nice crowd that comes and enjoys the weather and cheers,” because that way the park could be on the way to making this an annual event.

“We like to get that period of history out to the public. It’s a period that’s often overlooked,” Shutte said.

Shutte said she doesn’t know if the Hewitt family that lived at Ringwood Manor was ever active in base ball, although they were athletic, or if they had attended any base ball games. What’s certain is that the games were popular for both affluent and working class families in New Jersey in the 19th century and that smaller teams did play in the area, she said.

Most often a site like Ringwood Manor will see Civil War re-enactments as a special event. But Shaw said the Neshanocks differ from re-enactors of history because the outcome of the game is never predicted.

“We’re playing a real game. They’re not fighting a real war,” he said.

According to the club’s Web site, “The original Flemington Neshanock were established in 1866 and comprised mainly of the town’s prominent constituents.”

These ballists may have been prominent in the community, but the Web site goes on to say, members of the original team were “apparently not very skilled ballists and often lost to their chief rivals, the Lambertville Logan, by the close scores of 77-25 and 71-47.” No records of this team are apparent after August 1867.

Today’s Neshanock were re-established in 2001 by Shaw, “proudly reviving the name of that long ago team but hopefully not imitating their base ball skills,” the Web site states. The Neshanock, comprised of mostly New Jersey players, travel all over the East Coast keeping old-time baseball alive, Shaw said.

According to the Vintage Base Ball Association Web site, games like are not new and have been around since the 1980s. Proper rules interpretation is an important aspect to the game, and these rules also dealt with behavior, like no swearing.

The May 2 event is sponsored by Ringwood State Park staff and the North Jersey Highlands Historical Society. There are no bleachers for the public, but those visiting can bring their own chairs or blanket to sit upon. Picnic tables in the area are available on a first-come, first serve basis. Heavy rain will cancel the event. Ringwood State Park is located at 1304 Sloatsburg Road.

E-mail: rolando@northjersey.com

For Immediate Release

  T’S 1864 AGAIN AT OLD TIME BASE BALL FESTIVAL

Delaware Event One of the Largest Held

DELAWARE CITY, DELAWARE, April 22, 2010 Fort DuPont State Park in Delaware City, Delaware has been chosen as the site of a weekend-long First State 19th Century Base Ball Festival (First State Festival), a 14-team amateur vintage base ball competition, to be held the weekend of May 22-23, 2010.

The Mid-Atlantic Vintage Base Ball League has sanctioned the festival, which will be hosted by Delaware’s Diamond State Base Ball Club (BBC).  The event is free and open to the public.

The First State Festival will be one of the largest vintage base ball competitions of its kind and feature Vintage Base Ball Association clubs representing each state along the Eastern Seaboard, from Connecticut to Virginia.  Participating clubs include: hosts the Diamond State BBC; the Waterbury (CT) Connors BBC; the Atlantic BBC of Brooklyn (NY); the Resolute BBC of Elizabeth (NJ); the Flemington (NJ) Neshanock BBC; the Frosty Sons of Thunder (Somerset, PA); the Athletic BBC of Philadelphia (PA); the Eclipse BBC of Elkton (MD); the Dauntless BBC of Havre de Grace (MD); the Chesapeake BBC (Baltimore, MD); the Excelsior BBC of Arundel (Glen Burnie, MD); the Fair Play BBC of Talbot County (Easton, MD), the Potomac BBC (Washington, DC); and the Pastime BBC of Williamsburg (VA).  The weekend festival includes 19 vintage base ball matches played according to the rules and customs of 1864.

First State Festival information, including a Schedule of Matches, a festival area map, directions to Fort DuPont State Park, rules and customs to be used during festival play, and other information can be found at the First State Festival’s website: www.festival.diamondstatebaseball.org.

The nearby town of Delaware City will also be hosting an Old Fashioned Sidewalk Sale to coincide with the First State Festival.  Free jitney transportation during festival hours will be available between the Fort DuPont Parade Grounds and Delaware City’s business district shops and restaurants for all spectators and festival participants.

Information on the Vintage Base Ball Association, the Mid-Atlantic Vintage Base Ball League, the Diamond State Base Ball Club and Delaware City can be found at the following websites:

Vintage Base Ball Association –  www.vbba.org

Mid-Atlantic Vintage Base Ball League –  http://mavbbl.wordpress.com

Diamond State Base Ball Club –  www.diamondstatebaseball.org

Delaware City – http://www.delawarecity.info

Media Contact

John Medkeff, Chairman

First State 19th Century Base Ball Festival

302.981.5972

Email: diamondstatebc@comcast.net

-END-

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (April 23, 2010)

PHILADELPHIA’S FIRST VINTAGE BASE BALL CLUB READY TO MAKE HISTORY

PHILADELPHIA – The reincarnated Athletic Base Ball Club will open its inaugural season with a doubleheader in the 4th Annual Chopper Baseball Festival in Elkton, Maryland on Saturday.

Based on the amateur club of the same name that called Philadelphia home during the 19th century, Athletic is Philadelphia’s only vintage base ball club and plays the sport using the rules and customs of the 1860s.

The club aims to educate fans and children about Philadelphia’s storied baseball past.

“I was excited about turning people on to what I think was an exciting era in both the history of base ball as well as the history of Philadelphia,” said Athletic founder and manager Scott Alberts. “Forming a team to play actual games seemed like a particularly fun way to do that.”

Athletic will face the Elizabeth Resolutes Saturday morning with the first pitch scheduled for 11AM. The club will then face the Bohemia Eurekas in the afternoon with the first pitch scheduled for approximately 3PM.

Founded in the early 1980s, vintage base ball is baseball played by the rules and customs of the 19th century complete with period reproduction uniforms and equipment. Currently there are over 400 vintage base ball clubs across the nation.

Athletic will play 14 games this season, including six home games in Fairmount Park. The club opens the home portion of the schedule on May 2 against the Diamond State Base Ball Club.

For more information about Athletic visit http://www.philadelphiabaseballreview.com/pvbbc

Media inquiries should contact:
Patrick Gordon pgordon@philadelphiabaseballreview.com
http://www.philadelphiabaseballreview.com/pvbbc
215-776-6695

Scott Alberts
Athletic B.B.C. Manager
phillyvintagebbc@gmail.com

# # #

From the Diamond State BBC:

http://www.wdel.com/destories.php

From the Excelsior BBC of Arundel:

For All Press:

PRESS RELEASE

 March 25, 2010

     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Mid Atlantic Region— The Mid Atlantic Vintage Base Ball League (MAVBBL) announces the kick off of its 2nd season.  The league has more than doubled in size from 6 clubs in 2009 to 13 in 2010.  The original six clubs are joined by some of the most established and finest vintage clubs on the east coast as well as several new clubs to round out the league.  The circuit now extends from Brooklyn in the north to Williamsburg in the south.  Three divisions:  the northern division, eastern division, and southern division make up the 2010 league.

The Northern Division is made up of some of the best clubs in the Vintage Base Ball Association (VBBA).  The clubs include: the New York Gothams out of New York City, the Brooklyn Atlantics from Smithtown, Long Island; the Flemington (NJ) Neshanock, and the Elizabeth (NJ) Resolutes.  The Eastern Division is made up of the defending league champion Elkton (MD) Eclipse as well as the Chesapeake Nine from Baltimore; the Diamond State Base Ball Club of Delaware; the Dauntless Base Ball Club of Havre de Grace (MD) and newcomer the Athletic Base Ball Club of Philadelphia.  The Southern Division is made up of perennial power Talbot Fair Play BBC from Easton, MD as well as the Potomac Base Ball Club of Washington, DC and the Pastime BBC of Williamsburg (VA).  The newest club in vintage base ball will reside in the Southern Division in the Excelsior BBC of Arundel from Glen Burnie, MD.

The 13 clubs will be competing throughout the Summer by playing base ball (two words) the same way it was played in 1864 while civil war still ravaged and divided the country.  When fans come out to see a MAVBBL match, they will be transported back in time and see matches played using the same rules and customs used in 1864 using the same style of uniforms and equipment that clubs in the infancy of the nation’s pastime used.  Each club plays matches from the beginning of April until the end of October.

Each club will play each other club in its division at least once and no more than 4 times throughout the season.  The clubs with the best winning percentage in each division will move to the post season on October 2 and 3 in a format still to be determined.  Clubs not only will play matches within their division but also will play most of the other clubs in the league as well as participate in events with other vintage base ball clubs as well as compete in tournaments and festivals throughout the season.

Sanctioned MAVBBL tournaments in 2010 include the 4th Annual Chopper Festival in Elkton on April 24 and 25 featuring 12 clubs from the league and the inaugural First State 19th Century Base Ball Festival at Fort Delaware on May 22-23 with 14 clubs from Connecticut to Virginia.  MAVBBL clubs will be playing in other prestigious tournaments and festivals including the Silver Ball Tournament in Rochester, the NY/NJ Cup, the Gettysburg 19th Century Base Ball Tournament, the John Clarkson Classic in Cooperstown, the Colt Meadows Invitational, and the Old Time Base Ball Festival in Old Bethpage.

Keep up with the MAVBBL all year long by visiting the league’s website at http://www.mavbbl.wordpress.com .  A fan and the press can find everything from field locations and directions, schedules of clubs, results, standings, rules, match of the week information and much more.  The first league match is March 28 when the Chesapeake Club visits the Potomac Club of Washington.

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